Burial or cremation decision is biggest concern for those left to arrange a funeral service for a loved one

05 January 2018

Our recent survey has revealed that the biggest concern for people who have had to arrange a funeral service is whether the deceased would have preferred to be buried or cremated.

Burial or cremation

Worries over how they would afford to pay for the service and the music to play during the ceremony were other significant concerns.

The poll asked 1,000 men and women, aged 50 or above, what their biggest concerns would be when arranging a funeral service on behalf of someone else. The most common answer (34% of respondents) was that people would struggle to know whether the deceased would have wanted to be buried or cremated.

Another common concern for people was how they would pay for the service. In the same poll, respondents showed that they believed the current cost of a funeral service to be just over £4,000. When asked what their concerns would be when arranging a funeral service, 32% of respondents would be worried about how they would meet this cost. Other concerns included choosing the right piece of music to play at a service, who to invite and selecting the right funeral director on behalf of the deceased.

Taking out a pre-paid funeral plan is an effective way to make arrangements and financial provision for one’s own funeral in advance. This helps to alleviate affordability concerns for those left behind. Pre-paid funeral plans also provide a way for people to make their funeral wishes known. This means that when the time comes, loved ones are not left to make as many difficult funeral decisions on behalf of the deceased.

Marketing Manager, Emma Simpson, said: “The funeral directors we work with often tell us about how difficult it can be for people to make key funeral decisions on behalf of someone they’ve lost. Pre-paid funeral plans allow people to put these decisions down on paper and make choices in advance, while making financial provision at the same time. This means that when the time comes, the pressure of the decisions doesn’t compound any grief for the bereaved.”



Source: OnePoll Research of 1,000 men and women aged 50 and above on behalf of Ecclesiastical Planning Services, November 2017.